naterlies:

arthistorygifs:

Olympia - Édouard Manet
more info / frames / high res

A nice quick analysis of the painting in the gif and the 7 minute video linked, but sadly the discussion of Olympia’s maid is pretty much limited to noting the contrast between light and dark spaces. Olympia’s black maid is significant in the composition and she was certainly part of the public disgust when the painting was shown. I even learned about the painting last year in class, we called it ‘Olympia’s Maid’ not ‘Olympia’, which certainly changes the subject of the painting, though many other places seem to call the painting ‘Olympia’.
ANYWAY. The race of the maid IS significant - Manet made the choice to paint her as black, when he could easily have made her white. Manet plays on people’s expectations and turns them around in this painting - as the gif notes, Olympia is looking directly at the viewer, and not coyly away, and the broad brush strokes call attention to the fact this this IS a painting we’re looking at, not reality. Many in the 1860s believed black women were hyper sexual, the dangerous opposite of virginal white women. As a fully clothed and non-sexualized maid, she denies the viewer’s expectations by standing in such a stark contrast to Olympia (pretty obvious here - light/dark, unclothed/clothed). At the same time, stereotypes and her important placement in the image (she vertically divides half the painting and takes up a lot of space, in contrast to the woman in the background of ‘Venus of Urbino’) led many to speculate that there were also some shady lesbian themes goin’ on in the painting.
The very fact that Olympia’s maid takes up so much space in the painting and doesn’t fade into the background was contraversial. Though orientalist paintings that came in the next 20-30 years contrasted black and white  female bodies, the black women in those paintings were depicted in much more clearly subservient positions by bathing or dressing the white women who were meant to be looked upon as the subjects. While Olympia is still the subject in this painting, the addition of a black woman to an already offensive painting really pushed things over the edge for many art viewers.

naterlies:

arthistorygifs:

Olympia - Édouard Manet

more info / frames / high res

A nice quick analysis of the painting in the gif and the 7 minute video linked, but sadly the discussion of Olympia’s maid is pretty much limited to noting the contrast between light and dark spaces. Olympia’s black maid is significant in the composition and she was certainly part of the public disgust when the painting was shown. I even learned about the painting last year in class, we called it ‘Olympia’s Maid’ not ‘Olympia’, which certainly changes the subject of the painting, though many other places seem to call the painting ‘Olympia’.


ANYWAY. The race of the maid IS significant - Manet made the choice to paint her as black, when he could easily have made her white. Manet plays on people’s expectations and turns them around in this painting - as the gif notes, Olympia is looking directly at the viewer, and not coyly away, and the broad brush strokes call attention to the fact this this IS a painting we’re looking at, not reality. Many in the 1860s believed black women were hyper sexual, the dangerous opposite of virginal white women. As a fully clothed and non-sexualized maid, she denies the viewer’s expectations by standing in such a stark contrast to Olympia (pretty obvious here - light/dark, unclothed/clothed). At the same time, stereotypes and her important placement in the image (she vertically divides half the painting and takes up a lot of space, in contrast to the woman in the background of ‘Venus of Urbino’) led many to speculate that there were also some shady lesbian themes goin’ on in the painting.

The very fact that Olympia’s maid takes up so much space in the painting and doesn’t fade into the background was contraversial. Though orientalist paintings that came in the next 20-30 years contrasted black and white  female bodies, the black women in those paintings were depicted in much more clearly subservient positions by bathing or dressing the white women who were meant to be looked upon as the subjects. While Olympia is still the subject in this painting, the addition of a black woman to an already offensive painting really pushed things over the edge for many art viewers.

(via detailsdetales)

“He lit a cigarette. His glass of whiskey lit a cigarette. “I can only truly love my dead best friend,” he said, “but not in a gay way. Women wouldn’t understand. They’re too gay.” Both of the cigarettes agreed.”
— from Mallory Ortberg’s hilarious “Male Novelist Jokes.” (via morefunthanb4)

(via sardine-noises)

pylore:

Tacita Dean - Fatigues exhibition at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany (2012). Chalk on blackboard drawings of Afghanistan’s mountainous landscape. 
pylore:

Tacita Dean - Fatigues exhibition at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany (2012). Chalk on blackboard drawings of Afghanistan’s mountainous landscape. 

pylore:

Tacita Dean - Fatigues exhibition at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany (2012). Chalk on blackboard drawings of Afghanistan’s mountainous landscape. 

(via sardine-noises)

grimelords:

This was def the weirdest part of wolf of wall street in the diner scene when he said this unprovoked in the middle of conversation and leo sort of just kept talking like he hadn’t said anything? Maybe it’s because I watched a screener and it wasn’t in the finished version or something but it felt really weird character wise and the quality of the picture really dipped in that shot? idk, really weird

rabbit-warren:

Stroszek (Werner Herzog, 1977)
rabbit-warren:

Stroszek (Werner Herzog, 1977)
rabbit-warren:

Stroszek (Werner Herzog, 1977)

rabbit-warren:

Stroszek (Werner Herzog, 1977)

(via poetryof-motion)

juryrig:

i remember my brother telling me a story that started and stopped with how he got drunk and someone asked him if he remembered mac tonite and he just yelled “YEAH THAT GUY WAS A FUCKING ASSHOLE”

(via thatmetticguy)

cockbarf:

so i just sat down to eat my ‘im really drunk meal’ at 4am and sat next to this guy drawing and asked if i could check out his work and this is what he had just finished working on

(via rrxzxzxzzzzzzzz)

grawly:

when u have a bad day at school

image

(via cavebae)